w/ The Kernel
The Blue Room - Nashville, TN
January 27, 2023
All Ages
Tickets: $16 advanced /$20 day of show
Doors: 7:00pm
Show: 8:00pm


Please note that all ticket sales will be available at will-call the night of the show. Please be prepared with your email ticket confirmation, your name, and some form of identification to show the door person.

*All ticket sales are final. No refunds or exchanges will be permitted*


Caitlin Rose:

With a voice equal parts honeyed and world-weary, Caitlin Rose sings self-aware songs of self- destruction, documenting proclivity and impulse control, bad habits in life and in romantic pursuits. Her albums brim with incisive, well-observed tracks full of searching vulnerability, ruminating on the things done to us and the various coping mechanisms and behaviors we adopt to feel in control in their wake. A standout staple of Nashville’s rock scene, Rose is “witty, brilliant company” (Pitchfork) and a “promisingly wry lyricist” (The Guardian) with a “wily and impressive blend of melancholy and cheek.” (New York Times) On CAZIMI, Rose boldly dismisses the preconceived idea of what a “Caitlin Rose Album” should be. Instead, she skips across genres, combining new wave influences like Elvis Costello and Magnetic Fields with the pop stylings of Katrina and the Waves and the melancholy Americana of David Berman and Silver Jews alike into one cohesive mix-tape. But rather than disjointed parts, these songs form a cohesive, robust whole, reflecting the multifaceted complexity of a fully-realized personeven if things had to be pulled apart and put back together a few times to get there.


The Kernel:

It all started with a red polyester suit. The western-style outfit belonged to Joe Garner's father Charlie, who played bass on the Grand Ole Opry for thirty years, famously backing 'doodle-doo-doo' star Del Reeves. After his dad passed, Joe went into the attic of his family home, looking for a keepsake. What he found was an alter ego and the beginning of a rich, cathartic ten-year musical journey that culminates with his latest release, Listen to the Blood.

“I thought, I'm going to put this old suit on and I'm going to be my own version of some of these country guys, like my dad and Del,” says Garner. “That's how the project began. I thought of the name The Kernal in terms of 'kerning,' as in getting the letters straight in a design. Aligning myself is kind of the idea behind the name. I obviously had the love of country music that I got from my dad. But there were definitely some loose ends in our relationship that weren't tied before he died. That part of it drove me to put myself into this world and try to iron out some demons. Listen to the Blood is the last of a three-album arc, which has been about me trying to prove myself worthy in some ways in a game that my dad had ostensibly mastered.”

With a storyteller's eye and sly sense of humor that echoes not only his “honorary uncle” Del Reeves, but Tom T. Hall and Roger Miller, Garner delves deep into everything from family dysfunction to road trips to matters of the heart. The music, which he describes with a laugh as “diet country,” embodies the spirit of that genre without any of the slavishness or self-seriousness of much modern Americana. Rolling Stone has called his style “sweetly subversive, intellectual and addictive,” while Lo-Down said “the songs have an air of nostalgia but they sound far from old - modern, yet timeless.” 

Tickets
TICKET01272023

Nashville - Caitlin Rose Live at Third Man Records

Regular price $20.00 $16.00

Tickets also available at the door.

w/ The Kernel
The Blue Room - Nashville, TN
January 27, 2023
All Ages
Tickets: $16 advanced /$20 day of show
Doors: 7:00pm
Show: 8:00pm


Please note that all ticket sales will be available at will-call the night of the show. Please be prepared with your email ticket confirmation, your name, and some form of identification to show the door person.

*All ticket sales are final. No refunds or exchanges will be permitted*


Caitlin Rose:

With a voice equal parts honeyed and world-weary, Caitlin Rose sings self-aware songs of self- destruction, documenting proclivity and impulse control, bad habits in life and in romantic pursuits. Her albums brim with incisive, well-observed tracks full of searching vulnerability, ruminating on the things done to us and the various coping mechanisms and behaviors we adopt to feel in control in their wake. A standout staple of Nashville’s rock scene, Rose is “witty, brilliant company” (Pitchfork) and a “promisingly wry lyricist” (The Guardian) with a “wily and impressive blend of melancholy and cheek.” (New York Times) On CAZIMI, Rose boldly dismisses the preconceived idea of what a “Caitlin Rose Album” should be. Instead, she skips across genres, combining new wave influences like Elvis Costello and Magnetic Fields with the pop stylings of Katrina and the Waves and the melancholy Americana of David Berman and Silver Jews alike into one cohesive mix-tape. But rather than disjointed parts, these songs form a cohesive, robust whole, reflecting the multifaceted complexity of a fully-realized personeven if things had to be pulled apart and put back together a few times to get there.


The Kernel:

It all started with a red polyester suit. The western-style outfit belonged to Joe Garner's father Charlie, who played bass on the Grand Ole Opry for thirty years, famously backing 'doodle-doo-doo' star Del Reeves. After his dad passed, Joe went into the attic of his family home, looking for a keepsake. What he found was an alter ego and the beginning of a rich, cathartic ten-year musical journey that culminates with his latest release, Listen to the Blood.

“I thought, I'm going to put this old suit on and I'm going to be my own version of some of these country guys, like my dad and Del,” says Garner. “That's how the project began. I thought of the name The Kernal in terms of 'kerning,' as in getting the letters straight in a design. Aligning myself is kind of the idea behind the name. I obviously had the love of country music that I got from my dad. But there were definitely some loose ends in our relationship that weren't tied before he died. That part of it drove me to put myself into this world and try to iron out some demons. Listen to the Blood is the last of a three-album arc, which has been about me trying to prove myself worthy in some ways in a game that my dad had ostensibly mastered.”

With a storyteller's eye and sly sense of humor that echoes not only his “honorary uncle” Del Reeves, but Tom T. Hall and Roger Miller, Garner delves deep into everything from family dysfunction to road trips to matters of the heart. The music, which he describes with a laugh as “diet country,” embodies the spirit of that genre without any of the slavishness or self-seriousness of much modern Americana. Rolling Stone has called his style “sweetly subversive, intellectual and addictive,” while Lo-Down said “the songs have an air of nostalgia but they sound far from old - modern, yet timeless.”